Rare Used Knight Piano In Inventory

Used Knight Piano in Chicago

What if we all looked this good at 51!?

This Knight piano is not only a fantastic find because they rarely surface in the US, but also because this one appears to have been preserved in a vacuum. Knights were the primary premium piano brand of Great Britain for most of the 20th century and were the only pianos allowed to share the showroom at Steinway Hall in London.

This particular instrument has a unique style and finish that is simply not found in pianos anymore. The all-hardwood case features “butterfly” veneers – a process by which veneers are split and laid out symmetrically, as seen in this image. It’s even more rare for this theme to continue throughout each piece on the piano. It’s truly spectacular workmanship that was a British trademark for centuries.

Beyond that, Knights are beautifully-designed Instruments, with fantastic tone and touch. Despite Cordogan’s seeing thousands of pianos each year, we can still count on one hand how many times we have had a Knight piano in the past 30 years.

If you’re seeking a unique performance piano, we have your Knight in shining walnut.

For more information, call us at 630-584-5000 or visit chicagopianos.com!

Used Knight Piano - Plate

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Used piano deal of the week!

An amazing and unique piano has just arrived in our used inventory!

It is essentially the “Holy Grail” of used baby grand pianos: Made in Japan, polished ebony, and in like-new condition….
Kawai GM1 PE QuietTime--web
But what’s particularly special is that a new piano like this from Kawai or Yamaha doesn’t actually exist. New Yamaha/Kawai baby grands are now made in Indonesia. The consensus in the technical and musical community (along with the judge & jury called “The Internet”) is that the Indonesian-made Kawai and Yamaha pianos aren’t as desirable or as valuable as genuine Japanese-made pianos.

To sweeten the deal, this Kawai has been installed with a PianoDisc QuietTime silencing system which allows for all sorts of possibilities:

–Private practicing with headphones
–MIDI recording
–128 instrument tones
–8 drum kits
–16-track layering
–28 ensemble factory presets
–Multi-zone splitting
–Create setups
–Transpose
–Audio in/out connections
–Dual-function headphone jacks
–Built-in metronome

Comparing this piano to the current Yamaha GB1K with SG2 Silent system, this used Kawai wins by a landslide. It has over 10 times the number of sounds than the Yamaha, way more functionality, and it’s Japanese-made. The Yamaha SG2 Silent system that is installed on the Yamaha GB1K baby grand piano also doesn’t even have a metronome (let alone layering capabilities, preset/user instrument setups, drum kits, transpose, or even an LCD screen.)

Now, when you also consider that it is much more affordable than any new Yamaha Silent grand piano, the choice becomes very clear. Come check out our Kawai Silent Piano at Cordogan’s Pianoland or give us a call at 630-584-5000 (toll free 877-242-9944).

New York Times Article on Deep-Sixing Pianos

Here’s an interesting article from the New York Times about how many used pianos are actually hitting the dumpster these days.  No surprise over here. I’d say that a quarter of the used pianos that people are trying to SELL privately unfortunately belong in a dumpster.  I’d like to add two comments to this article:

1) I don’t think the article did a good job indicating that many used pianos ARE worth restoring and that the used piano industry is exponentially bigger than the new piano industry so buying a restored used piano is definitely a viable option for many piano buyers.

2) Stories like this can easily lead one to believe that if used pianos are getting thrown away, then a functioning one might only cost a few hundred dollars.  Unfortunately, that’s not the case.  Pianos are a lot like cars in the sense that cars often times go to the junkyard and get crushed, but it doesn’t mean that a good used car can be purchased for a few hundred dollars.  Heck, even a good used piano bench often fetches $200-300 at flea markets.  Moving a piano usually costs upwards of $300 and tuning is at least $100.  We’re up to $600 and we haven’t even mentioned a piano yet.  Add that to the countless hours of work that most of these pianos need ($75-100/hr. in-home service rates) plus replacement parts to take on new students and may have yourself a money pit.  Don’t get us wrong, we’re in the piano restoration business and love all that hourly labor work — but we also sell new & used pianos and offer sound advice to people who are wrestling with restoring a piano or buying a different one from us.

New York Times Article on Deep-Sixing Old Pianos

New York Times Article on Deep-Sixing Old Pianos

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/30/arts/music/for-more-pianos-last-note-is-thud-in-the-dump.html?pagewanted=1&_r=2